"

Take Count Cavour, for instance: now wasn’t his a great mind, and wasn’t he a real diplomat? … But just look at what he accomplished: oh, he achieved his aim; he united Italy; and what was the result? For twenty-five hundred years Italy has borne within her a universal and unifying idea - not some abstract idea, not some speculation of a bureaucratic mind, but something real and organic, the fruit of the life of a nation, the fruit of life in the real world: this was the unification of the entire world, first the ancient Roman unification, and then the papal one. The people who sprang up and disappeared in Italy during these two and a half thousand years realized that they were the bearers of a universal idea, and those who did not realize it still felt and sensed it. Science, art - everything was invested and imbued with this universal significance. Oh, yes, we have to admit that this universal idea over there at last wore itself out and was expended (although can that really be so?); but what was it that ultimately emerged in its place? What do we have to congratulate Italy about now? After Count Cavour’s diplomacy, what did she achieve that was better?

Prendete, per esempio, il conte di Cavour — non è un’intelligenza, non è un diplomatico? Io prendo lui come esempio perché ne è già riconosciuta la genialità e inoltre perché è già morto. Ma che cosa non ha fatto, guardate un po’; oh sì, ha raggiunto quel che voleva, ha riunito l’Italia e che ne è risultato? Per duemila anni l’Italia ha portato in sé un’idea universale capace di riunire il mondo, non una qualunque idea astratta, non la speculazione di una mente di gabinetto, ma un’idea reale, organica, frutto della vita della nazione, frutto della vita del mondo; l’idea dell’unione di tutto il mondo, da principio quella romana antica, poi la papale. I popoli cresciuti e scomparsi in questi due millenni e mezzo in Italia comprendevano di essere i portatori di un’idea universale, e quando non lo comprendevano, lo sentivano e le presentivano. La scienza, l’arte, tutto si rivestiva e penetrava di questo significato mondiale. Ammettiamo pure che questa idea mondiale, alla fine, si era logorata, stremata ed esaurita (ma è stato proprio così?) ma che cosa è venuto al suo posto, per che cosa possiamo congratularci con l’Italia, che cosa ha ottenuto di meglio dopo la diplomazia del conte di Cavour?

"

Fyodor Dostoyevsky’s A Writer’s Diary (cited in Marcello Veneziani, Grande civiltà, piccolo Stato: L’Italia secondo Dostoevskij, IlGiornale.it, 12 Dec 2011)

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"Tears dimmed his eyes so that he could no longer see the ikons, he felt heavy at heart; he prayed and besought god that the misfortunes that threatened him, that were ready to burst upon him to-morrow, if not to-day, might somehow pass him by as storm-clouds in times of drought pass over the village without yielding one drop of rain. And so many sins were heaped up in the past, so many sins, and getting away from them or setting them right was so beyond hope that it seemed incongruous even to ask forgiveness. But he did ask forgiveness, and even gave a loud sob, but no one took any notice of that, since they all supposed he had had a drop too much."

— Anton Chekhov, In The Ravine. (via fourtytheives)

(Source: ninetythieves)

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thefinalimage:

Through a Glass Darkly, 1961 (dir. Ingmar Bergman)

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unhappyhipsters:

The cat’s existential questioning had become increasingly tedious.

(Photo: J Bennet Fitts; Dwell)

Yes

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Arcade Fire presents Sprawl II (Mountains Beyond Mountains) (by MergeRecords)

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Ormond Gigli, Models in the Window, New York 1960.

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mythologyofblue:

A book is not an isolated being: it is a relationship, an axis of innumerable relationships.

-Jorge Luis Borges, from the essay, A Note On (Toward) Bernard Shaw, as found in Labyrinths: Selected Stories & Other Writings


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visual-poetry:

“people quote people - the death of the author 2.0” by paolo cirio

This artwork is a radical approach to the concept of the author as social degeneracy. The quotations no longer refer to the correct authors. In the mock website quotations are continually reordered randomly with different authors, spreading online misquotation mistakes as a form of liberation from the authorship fixation. This is a research into plagiarism and authorship issues in the era of the creative economy, with its attendant profusion of prosumers. (source)

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http://matadornetwork.com/abroad/20-awesomely-untranslatable-words-from-around-the-world/

“The ache/toská: No single word in English renders all the shades of toska. At it’s deepest and most painful, it is a sensation of great spiritual anguish, often without any specific cause. At less morbid levels it is a dull ache of the soul, a longing with nothing to long for, a sick pining, a vague restlessness, mental throes, yearning. In particular cases it may be the desire for somebody or something specific, nostalgia, lovesickness. At the lowest level it grades into ennui, boredom, skuka. The adjective tosklivïy is translatable as “dismal,” “dreary”.”

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dystopiabella:

paolo roversi

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soircharmant:

newman-hall:

Harold Cazneaux (New Zealand Australia 1878-1953) - Doris Zinkeisen : New Idea potrait with leaf background

Photographic cover for The Home magazine, Sydney, 1929

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dystopiabella:

signe vilstrup

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